Extracellular matrix (ECM) maintains the structural integrity of tissues and regulates cell and tissue functions. ECM is comprised of fibrillar proteins, proteoglycans (PGs), glycosaminoglycans, and glycoproteins, creating a heterogeneous but well-orchestrated network. This network communicates with resident cells via cell-surface receptors. In particular, integrins, CD44, discoidin domain receptors, and cell-surface PGs and additionally voltage-gated ion channels can interact with ECM components, regulating signaling cascades as well as cytoskeleton configuration. The interplay of ECM with recipient cells is enriched by the extracellular vesicles, as they accommodate ECM, signaling, and cytoskeleton molecules in their cargo. Along with the numerous biological properties that ECM can modify, autophagy and angiogenesis, which are critical for tissue homeostasis, are included. Throughout development and disease onset and progression, ECM endures rearrangement to fulfill cellular requirements. The main responsible molecules for tissue remodeling are ECM-degrading enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases, plasminogen activators, cathepsins, and hyaluronidases, which can modify the ECM structure and function in a dynamic mode. A brief summary of the complex interplay between ECM macromolecules and cells in tissues and the contribution of ECM in tissue homeostasis and diseases is given.

Extracellular matrix (ECM) maintains the structural integrity of tissues and regulates cell and tissue functions. ECM is comprised of fibrillar proteins, proteoglycans (PGs), glycosaminoglycans, and glycoproteins, creating a heterogeneous but well-orchestrated network. This network communicates with resident cells via cell-surface receptors. In particular, integrins, CD44, discoidin domain receptors, and cell-surface PGs and additionally voltage-gated ion channels can interact with ECM components, regulating signaling cascades as well as cytoskeleton configuration. The interplay of ECM with recipient cells is enriched by the extracellular vesicles, as they accommodate ECM, signaling, and cytoskeleton molecules in their cargo. Along with the numerous biological properties that ECM can modify, autophagy and angiogenesis, which are critical for tissue homeostasis, are included. Throughout development and disease onset and progression, ECM endures rearrangement to fulfill cellular requirements. The main responsible molecules for tissue remodeling are ECM-degrading enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases, plasminogen activators, cathepsins, and hyaluronidases, which can modify the ECM structure and function in a dynamic mode. A brief summary of the complex interplay between ECM macromolecules and cells in tissues and the contribution of ECM in tissue homeostasis and diseases is given.

The complex interplay between extracellular matrix and cells in tissues

Caon, Ilaria;Giaroni, Cristina;Passi, Alberto;Vigetti, Davide
Penultimo
;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Extracellular matrix (ECM) maintains the structural integrity of tissues and regulates cell and tissue functions. ECM is comprised of fibrillar proteins, proteoglycans (PGs), glycosaminoglycans, and glycoproteins, creating a heterogeneous but well-orchestrated network. This network communicates with resident cells via cell-surface receptors. In particular, integrins, CD44, discoidin domain receptors, and cell-surface PGs and additionally voltage-gated ion channels can interact with ECM components, regulating signaling cascades as well as cytoskeleton configuration. The interplay of ECM with recipient cells is enriched by the extracellular vesicles, as they accommodate ECM, signaling, and cytoskeleton molecules in their cargo. Along with the numerous biological properties that ECM can modify, autophagy and angiogenesis, which are critical for tissue homeostasis, are included. Throughout development and disease onset and progression, ECM endures rearrangement to fulfill cellular requirements. The main responsible molecules for tissue remodeling are ECM-degrading enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases, plasminogen activators, cathepsins, and hyaluronidases, which can modify the ECM structure and function in a dynamic mode. A brief summary of the complex interplay between ECM macromolecules and cells in tissues and the contribution of ECM in tissue homeostasis and diseases is given.
2019
978-1-4939-9132-7
978-1-4939-9133-4
Extracellular matrix (ECM) maintains the structural integrity of tissues and regulates cell and tissue functions. ECM is comprised of fibrillar proteins, proteoglycans (PGs), glycosaminoglycans, and glycoproteins, creating a heterogeneous but well-orchestrated network. This network communicates with resident cells via cell-surface receptors. In particular, integrins, CD44, discoidin domain receptors, and cell-surface PGs and additionally voltage-gated ion channels can interact with ECM components, regulating signaling cascades as well as cytoskeleton configuration. The interplay of ECM with recipient cells is enriched by the extracellular vesicles, as they accommodate ECM, signaling, and cytoskeleton molecules in their cargo. Along with the numerous biological properties that ECM can modify, autophagy and angiogenesis, which are critical for tissue homeostasis, are included. Throughout development and disease onset and progression, ECM endures rearrangement to fulfill cellular requirements. The main responsible molecules for tissue remodeling are ECM-degrading enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases, plasminogen activators, cathepsins, and hyaluronidases, which can modify the ECM structure and function in a dynamic mode. A brief summary of the complex interplay between ECM macromolecules and cells in tissues and the contribution of ECM in tissue homeostasis and diseases is given.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2078250
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