Brachial pulse pressure (PP) is an established risk marker for cardiovascular disease. PP is largely determined by the stroke volume in young subjects, although the progressive amplification of pulse wave from central to peripheral arteries could make brachial PP not representative of the central PP in the young. With advancing age, brachial PP better reflects the progressive stiffening of aorta and the large elastic arteries. PP correlates with vascular and cardiac hypertrophy, although the association with cardiac hypertrophy seems more closely attributable to systolic blood pressure (BP). An association has been noted in several longitudinal studies between PP and the incidence of major cardiovascular events. However, some longitudinal studies carried out in subjects with predominantly systolic and diastolic hypertension showed that PP is the dominant predictor of coronary events, while mean BP is the major predictor of cerebrovascular events. Such an assumption may not be held in subjects with isolated systolic hypertension, where a wide PP seems to predict coronary and cerebrovascular events to a similar extent. From a pathophysiological standpoint, a wide PP might reflect diffuse atherosclerotic processes potentially involving also the large coronary arteries. Some data suggest that a wide PP could also represent a direct and independent stimulus for progression of atherosclerosis.

Does brachial pulse pressure predict coronary events?

Angeli F
2007

Abstract

Brachial pulse pressure (PP) is an established risk marker for cardiovascular disease. PP is largely determined by the stroke volume in young subjects, although the progressive amplification of pulse wave from central to peripheral arteries could make brachial PP not representative of the central PP in the young. With advancing age, brachial PP better reflects the progressive stiffening of aorta and the large elastic arteries. PP correlates with vascular and cardiac hypertrophy, although the association with cardiac hypertrophy seems more closely attributable to systolic blood pressure (BP). An association has been noted in several longitudinal studies between PP and the incidence of major cardiovascular events. However, some longitudinal studies carried out in subjects with predominantly systolic and diastolic hypertension showed that PP is the dominant predictor of coronary events, while mean BP is the major predictor of cerebrovascular events. Such an assumption may not be held in subjects with isolated systolic hypertension, where a wide PP seems to predict coronary and cerebrovascular events to a similar extent. From a pathophysiological standpoint, a wide PP might reflect diffuse atherosclerotic processes potentially involving also the large coronary arteries. Some data suggest that a wide PP could also represent a direct and independent stimulus for progression of atherosclerosis.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11383/2085021
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