Ecosystem carbon cycling depends strongly on the productivity of plant species and the decomposition rates of the litter they produce. We tested the hypothesis that classifying plant functional types according to mycorrhizal association explains important interspecific variation in plant carbon cycling traits, particularly in those traits that feature in a hypothesized feedback between vegetation productivity and litter turnover. We compared data from standardized 'screening' tests on inherent potential seedling relative growth rate (RGR), foliar nutrient concentrations, and leaf litter decomposability among 83 British plant species of known mycorrhizal type. There was important variation in these parameters between mycorrhizal plant types. Plant species with ericoid mycorrhiza showed consistently low inherent RGR, low foliar N and P concentrations, and poor litter decomposability; plant species with ectomycorrhiza had an intermediate RGR, higher foliar N and P, and intermediate to poor litter decomposability; plant species with arbuscular- mycorrhiza showed comparatively high RGR, high foliar N and P, and fast litter decomposition. Within the woody species subset, differentiation in RGR between mycorrhizal types was mostly confounded with deciduous versus evergreen habit, but the overall differentiation in litter mass loss between mycorrhizal types remained strong within each leaf habit. These results indicate that, within a representative subset of a temperate flora, ericoid and ectomycorrhizal strategies are linked with low and arbuscular-mycorrhizal species with high ecosystem carbon turnover. The incorporation of mycorrhizal association into current functional type classifications is a valuable tool in the assessment of plant-mediated controls on carbon and nutrient cycling.

Carbon cycling traits of piant species are linked with mycorrhizal strategy.

CERABOLINI, BRUNO ENRICO LEONE;
2001-01-01

Abstract

Ecosystem carbon cycling depends strongly on the productivity of plant species and the decomposition rates of the litter they produce. We tested the hypothesis that classifying plant functional types according to mycorrhizal association explains important interspecific variation in plant carbon cycling traits, particularly in those traits that feature in a hypothesized feedback between vegetation productivity and litter turnover. We compared data from standardized 'screening' tests on inherent potential seedling relative growth rate (RGR), foliar nutrient concentrations, and leaf litter decomposability among 83 British plant species of known mycorrhizal type. There was important variation in these parameters between mycorrhizal plant types. Plant species with ericoid mycorrhiza showed consistently low inherent RGR, low foliar N and P concentrations, and poor litter decomposability; plant species with ectomycorrhiza had an intermediate RGR, higher foliar N and P, and intermediate to poor litter decomposability; plant species with arbuscular- mycorrhiza showed comparatively high RGR, high foliar N and P, and fast litter decomposition. Within the woody species subset, differentiation in RGR between mycorrhizal types was mostly confounded with deciduous versus evergreen habit, but the overall differentiation in litter mass loss between mycorrhizal types remained strong within each leaf habit. These results indicate that, within a representative subset of a temperate flora, ericoid and ectomycorrhizal strategies are linked with low and arbuscular-mycorrhizal species with high ecosystem carbon turnover. The incorporation of mycorrhizal association into current functional type classifications is a valuable tool in the assessment of plant-mediated controls on carbon and nutrient cycling.
2001
Functional type; Interspecific variation; Leaf habit; Litter decomposition; Mycorrhiza; Relative growth rate
Cornelissen, J. H. C.; Aerts, R.; Cerabolini, BRUNO ENRICO LEONE; Werger, M. J. A.; Ven Der Heijden, M. G. A.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2001 - Oecologia 129 611-619 - Carbon cycling traits of piant species are linked with mycorrhizal strategy.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Documento in Post-print
Licenza: DRM non definito
Dimensione 82.08 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
82.08 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/1486698
 Attenzione

L'Ateneo sottopone a validazione solo i file PDF allegati

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 262
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 253
social impact