The current model of compact bone is that of a system of longitudinal (Haversian) canals connected by transverse (Volkmann’s) canals. Models based on histology or microcomputed tomography lack the morphologic detail and sense of temporal development provided by direct observation. Using direct scanning electron microscopy observation, we studied the bone surface and structure of the intracortical canal system in paired fractured surfaces in rabbit femurs, examining density of canal openings on periosteal and endosteal surfaces, internal network nodes and canal sizes, and collagen lining of the inner canal system. The blood supply of the diaphyseal compact bone entered the cortex through the canal openings on the endosteal and periosteal surfaces, with different morphologic features in the midshaft and distal shaft; their density was higher on endosteal than on periosteal surfaces in the midshaft but with no major differences among subregions. The circumference measurements along Haversian canals documented a steady reduction behind the head of the cutting cone but rather random variations as the distance from the head increased. These observations suggested discontinuous development and variable lamellar apposition rate of osteons in different segments of their trajectory. The frequent branching and types of network nodes suggested substantial osteonal plasticity and supported the model of a network organization. The collagen fibers of the canal wall were organized in intertwined, longitudinally oriented bundles with 0.1- to 0.5-lm holes connecting the canal lumen with the osteocyte canalicular system.

Anatomy of the Intracortical Canal System: Scanning Electron Microscopy Study in Rabbit Femur.

CONGIU, TERENZIO;RASPANTI, MARIO;QUACCI, DANIELA ELENA
2009

Abstract

The current model of compact bone is that of a system of longitudinal (Haversian) canals connected by transverse (Volkmann’s) canals. Models based on histology or microcomputed tomography lack the morphologic detail and sense of temporal development provided by direct observation. Using direct scanning electron microscopy observation, we studied the bone surface and structure of the intracortical canal system in paired fractured surfaces in rabbit femurs, examining density of canal openings on periosteal and endosteal surfaces, internal network nodes and canal sizes, and collagen lining of the inner canal system. The blood supply of the diaphyseal compact bone entered the cortex through the canal openings on the endosteal and periosteal surfaces, with different morphologic features in the midshaft and distal shaft; their density was higher on endosteal than on periosteal surfaces in the midshaft but with no major differences among subregions. The circumference measurements along Haversian canals documented a steady reduction behind the head of the cutting cone but rather random variations as the distance from the head increased. These observations suggested discontinuous development and variable lamellar apposition rate of osteons in different segments of their trajectory. The frequent branching and types of network nodes suggested substantial osteonal plasticity and supported the model of a network organization. The collagen fibers of the canal wall were organized in intertwined, longitudinally oriented bundles with 0.1- to 0.5-lm holes connecting the canal lumen with the osteocyte canalicular system.
Pazzaglia, Ue; Congiu, Terenzio; Raspanti, Mario; Ranchetti, F; Quacci, DANIELA ELENA
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
ClinOrthopRelRes.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Altro materiale allegato
Licenza: DRM non definito
Dimensione 789.71 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
789.71 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11383/1715064
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 17
  • Scopus 38
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 38
social impact