This is a first attempt to systematically evaluate the philosophical implications of the phenomena of chaos and complexity. Basing on the results of nonlinear science and fractal geometry, I show that: a) explanation is really different from (and not reducible to) prediction; b) different levels of knowledge and reality actually exist; c) the aristotelian concept of "form" in many senses (although not in every sense) is very similar to the concept of "strange attractor"; d) in nonlinear dynamics and fractal geometry there is a kind of similarity, mathematically definible, which is not reducible to identity (as in classic geometry) and therefore is a good ground for the realistic interpretation of the universal terms; e) authomatical pattern recognition systems based on nonlinear dynamics and their limits demonstrate that human intelligence must have a non-logic component, i.e. intentionality; f) in a sense (although not in every sense) also mathematics can be considered an experimental science.

Chaos and complexity: philosophical implications

MUSSO, PAOLO
2000-01-01

Abstract

This is a first attempt to systematically evaluate the philosophical implications of the phenomena of chaos and complexity. Basing on the results of nonlinear science and fractal geometry, I show that: a) explanation is really different from (and not reducible to) prediction; b) different levels of knowledge and reality actually exist; c) the aristotelian concept of "form" in many senses (although not in every sense) is very similar to the concept of "strange attractor"; d) in nonlinear dynamics and fractal geometry there is a kind of similarity, mathematically definible, which is not reducible to identity (as in classic geometry) and therefore is a good ground for the realistic interpretation of the universal terms; e) authomatical pattern recognition systems based on nonlinear dynamics and their limits demonstrate that human intelligence must have a non-logic component, i.e. intentionality; f) in a sense (although not in every sense) also mathematics can be considered an experimental science.
Tito Fortunato Arecchi, Massimilano Berti (eds.)
The scientific and philosophical challenge of complexity
0000000000
5th International interdisciplinary seminar
Ponte di Legno (Italia)
27 Dicembre 1998 – 2 Gennaio 1999
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/18414
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