Background and Purpose of the study: Axillary lymph node status at the time of diagnosis remains one of the most important prognostic factors in women with breast cancer. Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) proved to be a reliable method for the evaluation of axillary nodal status in early-stage invasive breast cancer. The prognostic value and potential therapeutic consequences of SLN micrometastases remains a matter of great debate. Patients and Methods: From January 1998 to March 2011, 1,976 consecutive patients with non-metastatic invasive breast cancer underwent surgical treatment; 1,080 of them (54.6%) underwent SLNB. We collected data regarding demography, preoperative lymphoscintigraphy, type of surgery, histopathologic and immunohistochemical features and adjuvant treatment. Main findings: A mean number of 2.1±1.4 (range 1-13) SLN per patient were collected, a total of 2,294 nodes. SLNs were macrometastatic in 16.7% of patients and micrometastatic in 3.3%. Among the patients with positive SLN 93.6% underwent complete ALND. The overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of 72 patients with micrometastases in SLN at 60 months was 100%, similar to patients with negative SLN (98.7%), quite different from the DFS of N1-N3 patients (85.8%). Statistically significant differences in OS and DFS were observed between patients with N1mi and the group with N1-N3 sentinel node (p < 0.001 and p = 0.04) and also between patients with negative SLN and those with macrometastatic SLN (p < 0.001 for both). Conclusion: SLN micrometastases could represents an epiphenomenon of peritumoral lymphovascular invasion which impacts independently on the survival of patients with invasive breast cancer.

Prognostic role of micrometastases in sentinel lymph node in patients with invasive breast cancer

ROVERA, FRANCESCA ANGELA;BONI, LUIGI;DIONIGI, GIANLORENZO;DIONIGI, RENZO
2013

Abstract

Background and Purpose of the study: Axillary lymph node status at the time of diagnosis remains one of the most important prognostic factors in women with breast cancer. Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) proved to be a reliable method for the evaluation of axillary nodal status in early-stage invasive breast cancer. The prognostic value and potential therapeutic consequences of SLN micrometastases remains a matter of great debate. Patients and Methods: From January 1998 to March 2011, 1,976 consecutive patients with non-metastatic invasive breast cancer underwent surgical treatment; 1,080 of them (54.6%) underwent SLNB. We collected data regarding demography, preoperative lymphoscintigraphy, type of surgery, histopathologic and immunohistochemical features and adjuvant treatment. Main findings: A mean number of 2.1±1.4 (range 1-13) SLN per patient were collected, a total of 2,294 nodes. SLNs were macrometastatic in 16.7% of patients and micrometastatic in 3.3%. Among the patients with positive SLN 93.6% underwent complete ALND. The overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of 72 patients with micrometastases in SLN at 60 months was 100%, similar to patients with negative SLN (98.7%), quite different from the DFS of N1-N3 patients (85.8%). Statistically significant differences in OS and DFS were observed between patients with N1mi and the group with N1-N3 sentinel node (p < 0.001 and p = 0.04) and also between patients with negative SLN and those with macrometastatic SLN (p < 0.001 for both). Conclusion: SLN micrometastases could represents an epiphenomenon of peritumoral lymphovascular invasion which impacts independently on the survival of patients with invasive breast cancer.
Axillary dissection; Breast cancer; Micrometastases; Prognostic factors; Sentinel lymph node biopsy
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11383/1884723
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