Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) is a recognized second messenger; however, knowledge of cAMP involvement in plant physiological processes originates primarily from pharmacological studies. To obtain direct evidence for cAMP function in plants, tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells were transformed with the cAMP sponge, which is a genetically encoded tool that reduces cAMP availability. BY-2 cells expressing the cAMP sponge (cAS cells), showed low levels of free cAMP and exhibited growth inhibition that was not proportional to the cAMP sponge transcript level. Growth inhibition in cAS cells was closely related to the precocious inhibition of mitosis due to a delay in cell cycle progression. The cAMP deficiency also enhanced antioxidant systems. Remarkable changes occurred in the cAS proteomic profile compared with that of wild-type (WT) cells. Proteins involved in translation, cytoskeletal organization, and cell proliferation were down-regulated, whereas stress-related proteins were up-regulated in cAS cells. These results support the hypothesis that BY-2 cells sense cAMP deficiency as a stress condition. Finally, many proteasome subunits were differentially expressed in cAS cells compared with WT cells, indicating that cAMP signaling broadly affects protein degradation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway.

Cyclic AMP deficiency negatively affects cell growth and enhances stress-related responses in tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cells

VANNINI, CANDIDA;Marsoni, Milena;BRACALE, MARCELLA;
2016

Abstract

Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) is a recognized second messenger; however, knowledge of cAMP involvement in plant physiological processes originates primarily from pharmacological studies. To obtain direct evidence for cAMP function in plants, tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells were transformed with the cAMP sponge, which is a genetically encoded tool that reduces cAMP availability. BY-2 cells expressing the cAMP sponge (cAS cells), showed low levels of free cAMP and exhibited growth inhibition that was not proportional to the cAMP sponge transcript level. Growth inhibition in cAS cells was closely related to the precocious inhibition of mitosis due to a delay in cell cycle progression. The cAMP deficiency also enhanced antioxidant systems. Remarkable changes occurred in the cAS proteomic profile compared with that of wild-type (WT) cells. Proteins involved in translation, cytoskeletal organization, and cell proliferation were down-regulated, whereas stress-related proteins were up-regulated in cAS cells. These results support the hypothesis that BY-2 cells sense cAMP deficiency as a stress condition. Finally, many proteasome subunits were differentially expressed in cAS cells compared with WT cells, indicating that cAMP signaling broadly affects protein degradation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway.
www.wkap.nl/journalhome.htm/0167-4412
Antioxidant systems; cAMP-sponge; Cell cycle; Cell stress; Cyclic AMP; Tobacco BY-2 cells; Antioxidants; Cell Line; Cyclic AMP; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant; Plants, Genetically Modified; Proteomics; Stress, Physiological; Superoxide Dismutase; Time Factors; Tobacco; Transcriptome; Plant Science; Agronomy and Crop Science; Genetics; Medicine (all)
Sabetta, Wilma; Vannini, Candida; Sgobba, Alessandra; Marsoni, Milena; Paradiso, Annalisa; Ortolani, Francesca; Bracale, Marcella; Viggiano, Luigi; Blanco, Emanuela; de Pinto, Maria Concetta
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11383/2050647
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