OBJECTIVE: Hypothyroidism is complicated by neuromuscular symptoms (myalgias, slowness of movements, and tiredness) and signs (easy fatigability and cramps), which may have a negative impact on general well-being and quality of life. In a pilot, prospective, controlled study, we investigated the features of muscle dysfunction in hypothyroidism by disease questionnaire, biochemical measures, and physical performance tests. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-seven consecutive patients with newly diagnosed hypothyroidism were enrolled, 27 subclinical (S-Hypo) and 30 overt (O-Hypo). A series of 30 euthyroid subjects, with similar demographic characteristics, served as controls. Patients were administered a short disease questionnaire and underwent laboratory exams and standardized physical tests, both at baseline and after restoration of biochemical euthyroidism. RESULTS: Compared to euthyroid controls, the O-Hypo group showed significantly higher prevalence of neuromuscular symptoms and significantly higher serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels (p value < 0.0001). S-Hypo had slightly higher CPK levels and prevalence of neuromuscular symptoms than controls. Both S-Hypo and O-Hypo patients performed worse than controls in the six-minute walking test. Differences between patients and controls in handgrip strength test and timed chair standing test failed to reach statistical significance (although a trend was noticeable), possibly due to the small sample size. In O-Hypo, an inverse correlation was found between CPK levels and the handgrip strength test (p value < 0.001). Restoration of euthyroidism was associated with normalization of questionnaire responses, six-minute walking test, as well as serum CPK levels. CONCLUSION: In addition to neuromuscular symptoms, hypothyroidism is associated with abnormalities of physical performance. The six-minute walking test is the most valuable test to assess this aspect. In the pilot study, levothyroxine therapy could reverse muscle functional abnormalities.

Objective: Hypothyroidism is complicated by neuromuscular symptoms (myalgias, slowness of movements, and tiredness) and signs (easy fatigability and cramps), which may have a negative impact on general well-being and quality of life. In a pilot, prospective, controlled study, we investigated the features of muscle dysfunction in hypothyroidism by disease questionnaire, biochemical measures, and physical performance tests. Materials and Methods: Fifty-seven consecutive patients with newly diagnosed hypothyroidism were enrolled, 27 subclinical (S-Hypo) and 30 overt (O-Hypo). A series of 30 euthyroid subjects, with similar demographic characteristics, served as controls. Patients were administered a short disease questionnaire and underwent laboratory exams and standardized physical tests, both at baseline and after restoration of biochemical euthyroidism. Results: Compared to euthyroid controls, the O-Hypo group showed significantly higher prevalence of neuromuscular symptoms and significantly higher serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels (p value < 0.0001). S-Hypo had slightly higher CPK levels and prevalence of neuromuscular symptoms than controls. Both S-Hypo and O-Hypo patients performed worse than controls in the six-minute walking test. Differences between patients and controls in handgrip strength test and timed chair standing test failed to reach statistical significance (although a trend was noticeable), possibly due to the small sample size. In O-Hypo, an inverse correlation was found between CPK levels and the handgrip strength test (p value < 0.001). Restoration of euthyroidism was associated with normalization of questionnaire responses, six-minute walking test, as well as serum CPK levels. Conclusion: In addition to neuromuscular symptoms, hypothyroidism is associated with abnormalities of physical performance. The six-minute walking test is the most valuable test to assess this aspect. In the pilot study, levothyroxine therapy could reverse muscle functional abnormalities.

Physical performance in newly diagnosed hypothyroidism: a pilot study

Gallo, D;Piantanida, E;Veronesi, G;Tanda, M. L.;Toniolo,A;Ferrario, M.;Bartalena, L.
2017-01-01

Abstract

Objective: Hypothyroidism is complicated by neuromuscular symptoms (myalgias, slowness of movements, and tiredness) and signs (easy fatigability and cramps), which may have a negative impact on general well-being and quality of life. In a pilot, prospective, controlled study, we investigated the features of muscle dysfunction in hypothyroidism by disease questionnaire, biochemical measures, and physical performance tests. Materials and Methods: Fifty-seven consecutive patients with newly diagnosed hypothyroidism were enrolled, 27 subclinical (S-Hypo) and 30 overt (O-Hypo). A series of 30 euthyroid subjects, with similar demographic characteristics, served as controls. Patients were administered a short disease questionnaire and underwent laboratory exams and standardized physical tests, both at baseline and after restoration of biochemical euthyroidism. Results: Compared to euthyroid controls, the O-Hypo group showed significantly higher prevalence of neuromuscular symptoms and significantly higher serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels (p value < 0.0001). S-Hypo had slightly higher CPK levels and prevalence of neuromuscular symptoms than controls. Both S-Hypo and O-Hypo patients performed worse than controls in the six-minute walking test. Differences between patients and controls in handgrip strength test and timed chair standing test failed to reach statistical significance (although a trend was noticeable), possibly due to the small sample size. In O-Hypo, an inverse correlation was found between CPK levels and the handgrip strength test (p value < 0.001). Restoration of euthyroidism was associated with normalization of questionnaire responses, six-minute walking test, as well as serum CPK levels. Conclusion: In addition to neuromuscular symptoms, hypothyroidism is associated with abnormalities of physical performance. The six-minute walking test is the most valuable test to assess this aspect. In the pilot study, levothyroxine therapy could reverse muscle functional abnormalities.
2017
Handgrip strength test; Hypothyroidism; Physical performance; Physical tests; Six-minute walking test; Timed chair standing test
Gallo, D; Piantanida, E; Veronesi, G; Lai, A; Sassi, L; Lombardi, V; Masiello, E; Premoli, P; Bianconi, E; Cusini, C; Rosetti, S; Tanda, M. L.; Toniolo, A; Ferrario, M.; Bartalena, L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2061723
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