We found that different spectra, provided by light-emitting diodes or a fluorescent lamp, caused different photomorphological responses depending on tree seedling type (coniferous or broad-leaved), species, seedling development stage, and seedling fraction (shoot or root). For two conifers (Picea abies and Pinus sylvestris) soon after germination (40days), more seedling growth was related to a lower ratio of red-to-far-red (R:FR) light. As growth continued to 120days, spectra with a greater complement of blue light yielded more growth. Roots showed more plasticity to light spectra than shoots. In general for the evergreen broad-leaved Quercus ilex, spectra with additional R:FR than for conifers yielded more growth in the first 57days. Subsequently as seedlings grew, shoot growth appeared to be influenced less by light source than roots, with root length showing the greatest responses. Our results suggest that manipulating light spectra to foster desired seedling traits may be another tool for use in the production of high-quality seedlings as defined through the Target Plant Concept. Such seedlings are needed for restoration of the two billion hectares of degraded forestland, especially on harsh sites such as those found in the Mediterranean region, and to sequester carbon to mitigate climate change.

Tree seedling response to LED spectra: implications for forest restoration

Montagnoli, Antonio
;
Terzaghi, Mattia;Fulgaro, Nicoletta;Scippa, Gabriella Stefania;Chiatante, Donato
2018-01-01

Abstract

We found that different spectra, provided by light-emitting diodes or a fluorescent lamp, caused different photomorphological responses depending on tree seedling type (coniferous or broad-leaved), species, seedling development stage, and seedling fraction (shoot or root). For two conifers (Picea abies and Pinus sylvestris) soon after germination (40days), more seedling growth was related to a lower ratio of red-to-far-red (R:FR) light. As growth continued to 120days, spectra with a greater complement of blue light yielded more growth. Roots showed more plasticity to light spectra than shoots. In general for the evergreen broad-leaved Quercus ilex, spectra with additional R:FR than for conifers yielded more growth in the first 57days. Subsequently as seedlings grew, shoot growth appeared to be influenced less by light source than roots, with root length showing the greatest responses. Our results suggest that manipulating light spectra to foster desired seedling traits may be another tool for use in the production of high-quality seedlings as defined through the Target Plant Concept. Such seedlings are needed for restoration of the two billion hectares of degraded forestland, especially on harsh sites such as those found in the Mediterranean region, and to sequester carbon to mitigate climate change.
2018
www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/11263504.asp
environmental stresses; high-quality seedling; Mediterranean region; Photomorphological traits; Picea abies; Pinus sylvestris; Quercus ilex; Target Plant Concept;
Montagnoli, Antonio; Dumroese, R. Kasten; Terzaghi, Mattia; Pinto, Jeremiah R.; Fulgaro, Nicoletta; Scippa, Gabriella Stefania; Chiatante, Donato
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2073155
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