Within Djibouti (Gulf of Aden), the scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini) and milk shark (Rhizoprionodon acutus) are important components of the artisanal fishery and they are caught to be exported or sold for local consumption. However, little scientific information exists on the contamination load of these species in this area of the world. With global populations of elasmobranchs in decline, understanding the extent of contaminant exposure is critical to future conservation as well as to assess the health risks for consumers of these species. The contaminants analyzed in this study comprised PCB, DDT and trace elements in livers, muscles and fins of both hammerhead sharks and milk sharks. The overall organochlorine compounds (OCs) and trace elements concentrations were similar among the two sharks' species and the pattern of PCB and DDT tissue distribution showed the highest burdens in livers compared with muscles and fins. However, the different accumulation profiles of OCs among shark species suggest species-specific accumulation of these contaminants. The p,p'DDE/Sigma DDT ratios were equal or slightly higher than the critic value of 0.6, suggesting possible recent inputs of technical DDT in the area. Concentration of trace elements from this study were generally comparable to those found in sharks from other areas of the world and, highlight the wide variation in metal concentrations between species, individuals and tissues. As far as Hg is concerned, scalloped hammerhead sharks showed higher accumulation in muscles compared with milk sharks. Both species showed elevated concentration of Se, which might be related to high Hg levels since Se inhibits Hg toxicity. The potential cancer risk for PCB, Cd, Ni, Cr and As fell within the range of 10(-6)-10(-4), suggesting some concerns for the overall contamination levels in both species. Indeed, consuming of fish involves a mixture of all analyzed elements, and therefore, some potential risk might arise from regularly consuming these species. (C) 2019 Published by Elsevier B.V.

Trace elements and POPs in two commercial shark species from Djibouti: Implications for human exposure

Boldrocchi, G.
Conceptualization
;
Monticelli, D.
Formal Analysis
;
Bettinetti, R.
Project Administration
2019-01-01

Abstract

Within Djibouti (Gulf of Aden), the scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini) and milk shark (Rhizoprionodon acutus) are important components of the artisanal fishery and they are caught to be exported or sold for local consumption. However, little scientific information exists on the contamination load of these species in this area of the world. With global populations of elasmobranchs in decline, understanding the extent of contaminant exposure is critical to future conservation as well as to assess the health risks for consumers of these species. The contaminants analyzed in this study comprised PCB, DDT and trace elements in livers, muscles and fins of both hammerhead sharks and milk sharks. The overall organochlorine compounds (OCs) and trace elements concentrations were similar among the two sharks' species and the pattern of PCB and DDT tissue distribution showed the highest burdens in livers compared with muscles and fins. However, the different accumulation profiles of OCs among shark species suggest species-specific accumulation of these contaminants. The p,p'DDE/Sigma DDT ratios were equal or slightly higher than the critic value of 0.6, suggesting possible recent inputs of technical DDT in the area. Concentration of trace elements from this study were generally comparable to those found in sharks from other areas of the world and, highlight the wide variation in metal concentrations between species, individuals and tissues. As far as Hg is concerned, scalloped hammerhead sharks showed higher accumulation in muscles compared with milk sharks. Both species showed elevated concentration of Se, which might be related to high Hg levels since Se inhibits Hg toxicity. The potential cancer risk for PCB, Cd, Ni, Cr and As fell within the range of 10(-6)-10(-4), suggesting some concerns for the overall contamination levels in both species. Indeed, consuming of fish involves a mixture of all analyzed elements, and therefore, some potential risk might arise from regularly consuming these species. (C) 2019 Published by Elsevier B.V.
www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv
DDT; Gulf of Aden; Hammerhead shark; Milk shark; PCB; Trace elements; Animal Fins; Animals; Dietary Exposure; Djibouti; Environmental Monitoring; Humans; Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated; Mercury; Metals; Muscles; Seafood; Sharks; Trace Elements; Water Pollutants, Chemical; Environmental Engineering; Environmental Chemistry; Waste Management and Disposal; Pollution
Boldrocchi, G.; Monticelli, D.; Omar, Y. Moussa; Bettinetti, R.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2078988
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