Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions in women with urinary incontinence and/or lower urinary tract symptoms as compared to a general female population. Methods: We extensively evaluated 227 consecutive women (mean age 52; age range 19-66) complaining of urinary incontinence (UI) and/or lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) with a comprehensive history (including several validated questionnaires), a complete physical examination and a urodynamic multichannel evaluation. Two hundred and sixteen patients were eligible for sexual function investigation because 11 out of 227 (5%) were not interested in dealing with questions regarding their own sexuality and were thus excluded from the final evaluation results. A group of 102 age-matched women (mean age 54; age range 19-63) assessed for a yearly routine gynaecological evaluation and not complaining of urinary symptoms were enrolled as cross-sectional controls and investigated in accordance with the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Results: Sexual dysfunction was diagnosed in 99 out of 216 patients (46%). Of these, 34 (34%) reported hypoactive sexual desire, 23 (23%) reported sexual arousal disorder; 11 patients (11%) complained of orgasmic deficiency, and 44 (44%) suffered from sexual pain disorder (e.g., dyspareunia or non-coital genital pain). Women reporting low sexual desire commonly suffered from stress incontinence (47%). We found that 60% of the women with sexual arousal disorders and 61% of those with sexual pain disorders also complained of recurrent bacterial cystitis. Forty-six percent of those complaining of orgasmic phase difficulties also reported a troublesome urge incontinence. The FSFI values in both groups scored as follows (patients versus controls; median value; p value): desire: 2.0 vs. 3.2 (p < 0.01); arousal: 2.8 vs. 3.6 (p = n.s.); lubrication: 3.2 vs. 4.4 (p = 0.01); orgasm: 4.1 vs. 4.4 (p = n.s.); sexual satisfaction: 2.7 vs. 4.0 (p < 0.01); sexual pain: 1.8 vs. 4.0 (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Women reporting UI or LUTS also complained of sexual dysfunctions in a significantly higher number than a general, healthy female population not complaining of urinary symptoms. Investigation of female sexuality is suggested for these patients. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. OI Guazzoni, Giorgio Ferruccio/0000-0002-5713-8313

Sexual dysfunction is common in women with lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary incontinence: Results of a cross-sectional study

Deho' F;
2004-01-01

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions in women with urinary incontinence and/or lower urinary tract symptoms as compared to a general female population. Methods: We extensively evaluated 227 consecutive women (mean age 52; age range 19-66) complaining of urinary incontinence (UI) and/or lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) with a comprehensive history (including several validated questionnaires), a complete physical examination and a urodynamic multichannel evaluation. Two hundred and sixteen patients were eligible for sexual function investigation because 11 out of 227 (5%) were not interested in dealing with questions regarding their own sexuality and were thus excluded from the final evaluation results. A group of 102 age-matched women (mean age 54; age range 19-63) assessed for a yearly routine gynaecological evaluation and not complaining of urinary symptoms were enrolled as cross-sectional controls and investigated in accordance with the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Results: Sexual dysfunction was diagnosed in 99 out of 216 patients (46%). Of these, 34 (34%) reported hypoactive sexual desire, 23 (23%) reported sexual arousal disorder; 11 patients (11%) complained of orgasmic deficiency, and 44 (44%) suffered from sexual pain disorder (e.g., dyspareunia or non-coital genital pain). Women reporting low sexual desire commonly suffered from stress incontinence (47%). We found that 60% of the women with sexual arousal disorders and 61% of those with sexual pain disorders also complained of recurrent bacterial cystitis. Forty-six percent of those complaining of orgasmic phase difficulties also reported a troublesome urge incontinence. The FSFI values in both groups scored as follows (patients versus controls; median value; p value): desire: 2.0 vs. 3.2 (p < 0.01); arousal: 2.8 vs. 3.6 (p = n.s.); lubrication: 3.2 vs. 4.4 (p = 0.01); orgasm: 4.1 vs. 4.4 (p = n.s.); sexual satisfaction: 2.7 vs. 4.0 (p < 0.01); sexual pain: 1.8 vs. 4.0 (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Women reporting UI or LUTS also complained of sexual dysfunctions in a significantly higher number than a general, healthy female population not complaining of urinary symptoms. Investigation of female sexuality is suggested for these patients. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. OI Guazzoni, Giorgio Ferruccio/0000-0002-5713-8313
2004
Salonia, A; Zanni, G; Nappi, Re; Briganti, A; Deho', F; Fabbri, F; Colombo, R; Guazzoni, G; Di Girolamo, V; Rigatti, P; Montorsi, F
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2118553
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