Recent facial palsies are those in which fibrillations of the mimetic musculature remain detectable by electromyography (EMG). Such fibrillations generally cease 18–24 months after palsy onset. During this period, facial re-animation surgery seeks to supply new neural inputs to the facial nerve. Neural usable sources were divided into qualitative (contralateral facial nerve) and quantitative (hypoglossus and masseteric nerve), depending on the type of stimulus provided. To further improve the extent and quality of facial re-animation, we here describe a new surgical technique featuring triple neural inputs: the use of the masseteric nerve and 30% of the hypoglossus nerve fibres as quantitative sources was associated with the contralateral facial nerve (incorporated via two cross-face nerve grafts) as a qualitative source in order to restore facial movements in 24 consecutive patients. The use of two quantitative motor nerve sources together with a qualitative neural source appears to improve re-animation after facial paralysis, despite earlier doubts as to whether patients could use different nerves to produce facial movements. In fact, movement was much improved. Smiling according to emotions and blinking seem to be better assured if cross-face nerve grafting is performed in two steps rather than one.

Triple innervation for re-animation of recent facial paralysis

Rabbiosi D;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Recent facial palsies are those in which fibrillations of the mimetic musculature remain detectable by electromyography (EMG). Such fibrillations generally cease 18–24 months after palsy onset. During this period, facial re-animation surgery seeks to supply new neural inputs to the facial nerve. Neural usable sources were divided into qualitative (contralateral facial nerve) and quantitative (hypoglossus and masseteric nerve), depending on the type of stimulus provided. To further improve the extent and quality of facial re-animation, we here describe a new surgical technique featuring triple neural inputs: the use of the masseteric nerve and 30% of the hypoglossus nerve fibres as quantitative sources was associated with the contralateral facial nerve (incorporated via two cross-face nerve grafts) as a qualitative source in order to restore facial movements in 24 consecutive patients. The use of two quantitative motor nerve sources together with a qualitative neural source appears to improve re-animation after facial paralysis, despite earlier doubts as to whether patients could use different nerves to produce facial movements. In fact, movement was much improved. Smiling according to emotions and blinking seem to be better assured if cross-face nerve grafting is performed in two steps rather than one.
2018
Recent facial palsy; Quantitative stimulus; Qualitative stimulus; Masseteric nerve; Hypoglossus nerve; Cross-face nerve graft
Biglioli, F; Allevi, F; Rabbiosi, D; Cupello, S; Battista, Vma; Saibene, Am; Colletti, G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2118739
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