Aims : To evaluate the association of ultra-processed food (UPF) intake and mortality among individuals with history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and analyse some biological pathways possibly relating UPF intake to death. Methods and results : Longitudinal analysis on 1171 men and women (mean age: 67 ± 10 years) with history of CVD, recruited in the Moli-sani Study (2005-10, Italy) and followed for 10.6 years (median). Food intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. UPF was defined using the NOVA classification according to degree of processing and categorized as quartiles of the ratio (%) between UPF (g/day) and total food consumed (g/day). The mediating effects of 18 inflammatory, metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal biomarkers were evaluated using a logistic regression model within a counterfactual framework. In multivariable-adjusted Cox analyses, higher intake of UPF (Q4, ≥11.3% of total food), as opposed to the lowest (Q1, UPF <4.7%), was associated with higher hazards of all-cause (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.38; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00-1.91) and CVD mortality (HR: 1.65; 95% CI: 1.07-2.55). A linear dose-response relationship of 1% increment in UPF intake with all-cause and CVD mortality was also observed. Altered levels of cystatin C explained 18.3% and 16.6% of the relation between UPF (1% increment in the diet) with all-cause and CVD mortality, respectively. Conclusion : A diet rich in UPF is associated with increased hazards of all-cause and CVD mortality among individuals with prior cardiovascular events, possibly through an altered renal function. Elevated UPF intake represents a major public health concern in secondary CVD prevention.

Ultra-processed food intake and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in individuals with cardiovascular disease: the Moli-sani Study

De Curtis, Amalia;Iacoviello, Licia
Ultimo
2021-01-01

Abstract

Aims : To evaluate the association of ultra-processed food (UPF) intake and mortality among individuals with history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and analyse some biological pathways possibly relating UPF intake to death. Methods and results : Longitudinal analysis on 1171 men and women (mean age: 67 ± 10 years) with history of CVD, recruited in the Moli-sani Study (2005-10, Italy) and followed for 10.6 years (median). Food intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. UPF was defined using the NOVA classification according to degree of processing and categorized as quartiles of the ratio (%) between UPF (g/day) and total food consumed (g/day). The mediating effects of 18 inflammatory, metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal biomarkers were evaluated using a logistic regression model within a counterfactual framework. In multivariable-adjusted Cox analyses, higher intake of UPF (Q4, ≥11.3% of total food), as opposed to the lowest (Q1, UPF <4.7%), was associated with higher hazards of all-cause (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.38; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00-1.91) and CVD mortality (HR: 1.65; 95% CI: 1.07-2.55). A linear dose-response relationship of 1% increment in UPF intake with all-cause and CVD mortality was also observed. Altered levels of cystatin C explained 18.3% and 16.6% of the relation between UPF (1% increment in the diet) with all-cause and CVD mortality, respectively. Conclusion : A diet rich in UPF is associated with increased hazards of all-cause and CVD mortality among individuals with prior cardiovascular events, possibly through an altered renal function. Elevated UPF intake represents a major public health concern in secondary CVD prevention.
2021
Biomarkers; Mortality; Secondary cardiovascular prevention; Ultra-processed food
Bonaccio, Marialaura; Costanzo, Simona; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Persichillo, Mariarosaria; Magnacca, Sara; De Curtis, Amalia; Cerletti, Chiara; Donati, Maria Benedetta; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2124148
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