Purpose This study aimed to assess 16-wk improvements of physical fitness, metabolic, and psychological parameters in people living with HIV (PLWH) exercising with the support of a smartphone application, as compared with a control group exercising without application. Methods This was a randomized, open-label, pilot study enrolling PLWH in a 16-wk protocol consisting of moderate physical activity three times per week, which included an initial coach-supervised period of 4 wk, followed by 12 wk where participants trained independently. Participants were allocated to either an experimental group that trained using a smartphone application (APP) or a control group that practiced following a hard copy training program (No-APP). At baseline (BL) and after 16 wk (W16), patients were assessed for cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition, blood lipid profile, and POMS. Results Forty-eight PLWH were screened and 38 were eligible: 20 were allocated to the APP group and 18 to the No-APP group. Two APP and two No-APP participants were lost to follow-up. Intention-to-treat analysis showed a W16 improvement from BL of ≥15% V O2peak in 13 (72%) of 18 in APP, but only in 3 (19%) of 16 in No-APP participants (P = 0.025). Significant W16 improvements were observed in APP, but not in No-APP participants, in VO2peak; fat mass and fat-free mass percent; total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides; vigor; and total mood by POMS. Accordingly, significant percent change differences between the APP and the No-APP groups were observed in VO2peak; fat and fat-free mass percent; total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides; and depression, vigor, anger, and total mood by POMS. Conclusions Exercising using a smartphone application improved cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition, cholesterol profiles, and psychological outcomes in PLWH.

A Mobile Application for Exercise Intervention in People Living with HIV

Merati G.;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Purpose This study aimed to assess 16-wk improvements of physical fitness, metabolic, and psychological parameters in people living with HIV (PLWH) exercising with the support of a smartphone application, as compared with a control group exercising without application. Methods This was a randomized, open-label, pilot study enrolling PLWH in a 16-wk protocol consisting of moderate physical activity three times per week, which included an initial coach-supervised period of 4 wk, followed by 12 wk where participants trained independently. Participants were allocated to either an experimental group that trained using a smartphone application (APP) or a control group that practiced following a hard copy training program (No-APP). At baseline (BL) and after 16 wk (W16), patients were assessed for cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition, blood lipid profile, and POMS. Results Forty-eight PLWH were screened and 38 were eligible: 20 were allocated to the APP group and 18 to the No-APP group. Two APP and two No-APP participants were lost to follow-up. Intention-to-treat analysis showed a W16 improvement from BL of ≥15% V O2peak in 13 (72%) of 18 in APP, but only in 3 (19%) of 16 in No-APP participants (P = 0.025). Significant W16 improvements were observed in APP, but not in No-APP participants, in VO2peak; fat mass and fat-free mass percent; total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides; vigor; and total mood by POMS. Accordingly, significant percent change differences between the APP and the No-APP groups were observed in VO2peak; fat and fat-free mass percent; total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides; and depression, vigor, anger, and total mood by POMS. Conclusions Exercising using a smartphone application improved cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition, cholesterol profiles, and psychological outcomes in PLWH.
2020
BODY COMPOSITION; CHOLESTEROL; HEALTH; PHYSICAL ACTIVITY; PHYSICAL FITNESS; SMART DEVICES; Adult; Anti-HIV Agents; Body Composition; Cardiorespiratory Fitness; Exercise Therapy; Female; HIV Infections; Humans; Lipids; Male; Middle Aged; Patient Compliance; Pilot Projects; Smartphone; Affect; Mobile Applications
Bonato, M.; Turrini, F.; De Zan, V.; Meloni, A.; Plebani, M.; Brambilla, E.; Giordani, A.; Vitobello, C.; Caccia, R.; Piacentini, M. F.; La Torre, A.; Lazzarin, A.; Merati, G.; Galli, L.; Cinque, P.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2125897
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