The epidemiology of respiratory viruses (RVs) in lung transplant recipients (LTRs) and the relationship of RVs to lung function, acute rejection (AR) and opportunistic infections in these patients are not well known. We performed a prospective cohort study (2009-2014) by collecting nasopharyngeal swabs (NPSs) from asymptomatic LTRs during seasonal changes and from LTRs with upper respiratory tract infectious disease (URTID), lower respiratory tract infectious disease (LRTID) and AR. NPSs were analyzed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Overall, 1094 NPSs were collected from 98 patients with a 23.6% positivity rate and mean follow-up of 3.4 years (interquartile range 2.5-4.0 years). Approximately half of URTIDs (47 of 97, 48.5%) and tracheobronchitis cases (22 of 56, 39.3%) were caused by picornavirus, whereas pneumonia was caused mainly by paramyxovirus (four of nine, 44.4%) and influenza (two of nine, 22.2%). In LTRs with LRTID, lung function changed significantly at 1 mo (p = 0.03) and 3 mo (p = 0.04). In a nested case-control analysis, AR was associated with RVs (hazard ratio [HR] 6.54), Pseudomonas aeruginosa was associated with LRTID (HR 8.54), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication or disease was associated with URTID (HR 2.53) in the previous 3 mo. There was no association between RVs and Aspergillus spp. colonization or infection (HR 0.71). In conclusion, we documented a high incidence of RV infections in LTRs. LRTID produced significant lung function abnormalities. Associations were observed between AR and RVs, between P. aeruginosa colonization or infection and LRTID, and between CMV replication or disease and URTID. A large prospective study of the epidemiology of respiratory viruses in lung transplant recipients using molecular assays demonstrates a very high incidence of respiratory viral infection and an association between respiratory virus infectious diseases, immediate allograft dysfunction, and the development of acute rejection and opportunistic infection.

Epidemiology and Immediate Indirect Effects of Respiratory Viruses in Lung Transplant Recipients: A 5-Year Prospective Study

Peghin M;
2017-01-01

Abstract

The epidemiology of respiratory viruses (RVs) in lung transplant recipients (LTRs) and the relationship of RVs to lung function, acute rejection (AR) and opportunistic infections in these patients are not well known. We performed a prospective cohort study (2009-2014) by collecting nasopharyngeal swabs (NPSs) from asymptomatic LTRs during seasonal changes and from LTRs with upper respiratory tract infectious disease (URTID), lower respiratory tract infectious disease (LRTID) and AR. NPSs were analyzed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Overall, 1094 NPSs were collected from 98 patients with a 23.6% positivity rate and mean follow-up of 3.4 years (interquartile range 2.5-4.0 years). Approximately half of URTIDs (47 of 97, 48.5%) and tracheobronchitis cases (22 of 56, 39.3%) were caused by picornavirus, whereas pneumonia was caused mainly by paramyxovirus (four of nine, 44.4%) and influenza (two of nine, 22.2%). In LTRs with LRTID, lung function changed significantly at 1 mo (p = 0.03) and 3 mo (p = 0.04). In a nested case-control analysis, AR was associated with RVs (hazard ratio [HR] 6.54), Pseudomonas aeruginosa was associated with LRTID (HR 8.54), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication or disease was associated with URTID (HR 2.53) in the previous 3 mo. There was no association between RVs and Aspergillus spp. colonization or infection (HR 0.71). In conclusion, we documented a high incidence of RV infections in LTRs. LRTID produced significant lung function abnormalities. Associations were observed between AR and RVs, between P. aeruginosa colonization or infection and LRTID, and between CMV replication or disease and URTID. A large prospective study of the epidemiology of respiratory viruses in lung transplant recipients using molecular assays demonstrates a very high incidence of respiratory viral infection and an association between respiratory virus infectious diseases, immediate allograft dysfunction, and the development of acute rejection and opportunistic infection.
2017
Peghin, M; Hirsch, Hh; Len, O; Codina, G; Berastegui, C; Saez, B; Sole, J; Cabral, E; Sole, A; Zurbano, F; Lopez-Medrano, F; Roman, A; Gavalda, J
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2129596
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