Background and aims: The CASSIOPEA Study was designed to evaluate whether the economic downturn during the late 2000s was a contributing factor to the observed decrease in adherence to Mediterranean diet (MD). Methods and results: The study protocol consists of two steps: A) recall of 7406 men and women who, between 2005 and 2006, had been randomly recruited in the Moli-sani Study from the general population of Molise, to assess possible economic hardship (EH) related to the economic crisis initiated in 2007; B) re-examination, between 2017 and 2020, of available subjects identified in Step 1 as poorly or harder hit by EH to test the hypothesis that EH is associated with a decrease in MD adherence, possibly resulting in increased inflammation. The results of Step 1 are reported here. From the initial sample of individuals re-examined after 12.6 years (median; IQR = 12.1–13.0 y), 3646 were finally analysed. An Economic Hardship Score (EHS; range 0–14) was obtained by scoring three domains: 1) change in employment status; 2) financial hardship and 3) financial hardship for health expenditures. Overall, 37.8% of the sample reported high EHS (≥3), whilst 32% scored 0 (no EH). Those with high EHS were prevalently women and younger, with low socioeconomic status. Conclusions: High economic hardship was prevalently reported by weaker socioeconomic groups. Longitudinal analysis (step 2) will examine whether the economic crisis had an effect on adherence to Mediterranean diet with consequent potential impact on inflammation, one of the main biological pathways linking MD to health outcomes. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT03119142.

The CASSIOPEA Study (Economic Crisis and Adherence to the Mediterranean diet: poSSIble impact on biOmarkers of inflammation and metabolic PhEnotypes in the cohort of the Moli-sAni Study): Rationale, design and characteristics of participants

De Curtis A.;Iacoviello L.
Ultimo
2021-01-01

Abstract

Background and aims: The CASSIOPEA Study was designed to evaluate whether the economic downturn during the late 2000s was a contributing factor to the observed decrease in adherence to Mediterranean diet (MD). Methods and results: The study protocol consists of two steps: A) recall of 7406 men and women who, between 2005 and 2006, had been randomly recruited in the Moli-sani Study from the general population of Molise, to assess possible economic hardship (EH) related to the economic crisis initiated in 2007; B) re-examination, between 2017 and 2020, of available subjects identified in Step 1 as poorly or harder hit by EH to test the hypothesis that EH is associated with a decrease in MD adherence, possibly resulting in increased inflammation. The results of Step 1 are reported here. From the initial sample of individuals re-examined after 12.6 years (median; IQR = 12.1–13.0 y), 3646 were finally analysed. An Economic Hardship Score (EHS; range 0–14) was obtained by scoring three domains: 1) change in employment status; 2) financial hardship and 3) financial hardship for health expenditures. Overall, 37.8% of the sample reported high EHS (≥3), whilst 32% scored 0 (no EH). Those with high EHS were prevalently women and younger, with low socioeconomic status. Conclusions: High economic hardship was prevalently reported by weaker socioeconomic groups. Longitudinal analysis (step 2) will examine whether the economic crisis had an effect on adherence to Mediterranean diet with consequent potential impact on inflammation, one of the main biological pathways linking MD to health outcomes. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT03119142.
2021
Economic crisis; Mediterranean diet; Socioeconomic disparities; Socioeconomic factors
Bonaccio, M.; Costanzo, S.; Di Castelnuovo, A.; Persichillo, M.; De Curtis, A.; Olivieri, M.; Cerletti, C.; Donati, M. B.; de Gaetano, G.; Iacoviello, L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2130142
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