Objective: To address the lack of information about clinical sequelae of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Patients and methods: Previously hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were attending the outpatient clinic for post-COVID-19 patients (ASST Ovest Milanese, Magenta, Italy) were included in this retrospective study. They underwent blood draw for complete blood count, C-reactive protein, ferritin, D-dimer, and arterial blood gas analysis and chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan. The primary endpoint was the assessment of blood gas exchanges after 3 months. Other endpoints included the assessment of symptoms and chest HRCT scan abnormalities and changes in inflammatory biomarkers after 3 months from hospital admission. Results: Eighty-eight patients (n = 65 men; 73.9%) were included. Admission arterial blood gas analysis showed hypoxia and hypocapnia and an arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fractional inspired oxygen ratio of 271.4 (interquartile range [IQR]: 238-304.7) mm Hg that greatly improved after 3 months (426.19 [IQR: 395.2-461.9] mm Hg, P<.001). Forty percent of patients were still hypocapnic after 3 months. Inflammatory biomarkers dramatically improved after 3 months from hospitalization. Fever, resting dyspnea, and cough were common at hospital admission and improved after 3 months, when dyspnea on exertion and arthralgias arose. On chest HRCT scan, more than half of individuals still presented with interstitial involvement after 3 months. Positive correlations between the interstitial pattern at 3 months and dyspnea on admission were found. C-reactive protein at admission was positively associated with the presence of interstitial involvement at follow-up. The persistence of cough was associated with presence of bronchiectasis and consolidation on follow-up chest HRCT scan. Conclusion: Whereas inflammatory biomarker levels normalized after 3 months, signs of lung damage persisted for a longer period. These findings support the need for implementing post-COVID-19 outpatient clinics to closely follow-up COVID-19 patients after hospitalization.

Lung Function and Symptoms in Post-COVID-19 Patients: A Single-Center Experience

Mumoli, Nicola;Dentali, Francesco
2021-01-01

Abstract

Objective: To address the lack of information about clinical sequelae of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Patients and methods: Previously hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were attending the outpatient clinic for post-COVID-19 patients (ASST Ovest Milanese, Magenta, Italy) were included in this retrospective study. They underwent blood draw for complete blood count, C-reactive protein, ferritin, D-dimer, and arterial blood gas analysis and chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan. The primary endpoint was the assessment of blood gas exchanges after 3 months. Other endpoints included the assessment of symptoms and chest HRCT scan abnormalities and changes in inflammatory biomarkers after 3 months from hospital admission. Results: Eighty-eight patients (n = 65 men; 73.9%) were included. Admission arterial blood gas analysis showed hypoxia and hypocapnia and an arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fractional inspired oxygen ratio of 271.4 (interquartile range [IQR]: 238-304.7) mm Hg that greatly improved after 3 months (426.19 [IQR: 395.2-461.9] mm Hg, P<.001). Forty percent of patients were still hypocapnic after 3 months. Inflammatory biomarkers dramatically improved after 3 months from hospitalization. Fever, resting dyspnea, and cough were common at hospital admission and improved after 3 months, when dyspnea on exertion and arthralgias arose. On chest HRCT scan, more than half of individuals still presented with interstitial involvement after 3 months. Positive correlations between the interstitial pattern at 3 months and dyspnea on admission were found. C-reactive protein at admission was positively associated with the presence of interstitial involvement at follow-up. The persistence of cough was associated with presence of bronchiectasis and consolidation on follow-up chest HRCT scan. Conclusion: Whereas inflammatory biomarker levels normalized after 3 months, signs of lung damage persisted for a longer period. These findings support the need for implementing post-COVID-19 outpatient clinics to closely follow-up COVID-19 patients after hospitalization.
2021
ABG, arterial blood gas; COVID-19, coronavirus disease 2019; CRP, C-reactive protein; CT, computed tomography; DOE, dyspnea on exertion; GGO, ground-glass opacity; HRCT, high-resolution computed tomography; IQR, interquartile range; PFT, pulmonary function test; PaCO2, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide; PaO2, arterial partial pressure of oxygen; PaO2/FiO2, ratio of arterial partial pressure of oxygen to fractional inspired oxygen; SARS-CoV-2, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2; V/Q, ventilation/perfusion ratio
Mumoli, Nicola; Bonaventura, Aldo; Colombo, Alessandra; Vecchié, Alessandra; Cei, Marco; Vitale, José; Pavan, Luca; Mazzone, Antonino; Dentali, Francesco
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2146599
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