Polycythemia vera (PV) is a Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by excessive myeloid cells production, mostly secondary to mutations in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) gene. PV natural history might be burdened by thrombotic events (TEs) and evolution into post-PV myelofibrosis (PPV-MF) or blast phase (BP). To date, no treatment strategies have been shown to have disease modifying effects, so therapy is directed at preventing TEs. All patients require phlebotomies (PHLs) to keep hematocrit below 45% and once-daily low dose aspirin (if not contraindicated). Apart from patients at "high risk" because of age over 60 years or a thrombosis history, cytoreductive therapies (CT) should be given to patients with relevant signs of myeloproliferation or intolerance to PHLs. Approved choices both for first and second line CT are hydroxyurea (HU) and pegylated forms of interferon (peg-IFN), the latter probably being better for young patients, and subjects without critical and recent vascular events or massive splenomegaly. The JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib is the treatment of choice in case of resistance/intolerance to HU, with proved efficacy in terms of thrombotic prevention. Data are too preliminary to consider CT for "low risk" PV cases, but ropeg-IFN is being studied in this setting with a short follow-up. A careful monitoring for signs of evolution into PPV-MF is fundamental for optimizing patient management.

Polycythemia Vera: Is It Time to Rethink Treatment?

Passamonti, Francesco
Ultimo
Membro del Collaboration Group
2023-01-01

Abstract

Polycythemia vera (PV) is a Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by excessive myeloid cells production, mostly secondary to mutations in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) gene. PV natural history might be burdened by thrombotic events (TEs) and evolution into post-PV myelofibrosis (PPV-MF) or blast phase (BP). To date, no treatment strategies have been shown to have disease modifying effects, so therapy is directed at preventing TEs. All patients require phlebotomies (PHLs) to keep hematocrit below 45% and once-daily low dose aspirin (if not contraindicated). Apart from patients at "high risk" because of age over 60 years or a thrombosis history, cytoreductive therapies (CT) should be given to patients with relevant signs of myeloproliferation or intolerance to PHLs. Approved choices both for first and second line CT are hydroxyurea (HU) and pegylated forms of interferon (peg-IFN), the latter probably being better for young patients, and subjects without critical and recent vascular events or massive splenomegaly. The JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib is the treatment of choice in case of resistance/intolerance to HU, with proved efficacy in terms of thrombotic prevention. Data are too preliminary to consider CT for "low risk" PV cases, but ropeg-IFN is being studied in this setting with a short follow-up. A careful monitoring for signs of evolution into PPV-MF is fundamental for optimizing patient management.
2023
2022
Hydroxyurea; Interferons; Ruxolitinib; Secondary myelofibrosis; Thrombosis
Mora, Barbara; Passamonti, Francesco
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2146704
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