This paper presents the limitations and potential of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy applied to the study of cellulosic textile collections The technique helps to differentiate natural fibres according to the content of lignin, pectin, hemicellulose, and wax, although some problematic issues should be considered. The spectral differences derived from the environmental humidity uptake and the plant composition are reviewed and discussed in the light of new experimental data. Diagnostic bands are proposed that can discriminate between different fibres from different plants. The contribution of ageing is also considered, demonstrating that sometimes aged fibres cannot be reliably recognised. In contrast, the potential of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to discriminate between natural and modified fibres is discussed and proven. The best results were obtained when microinvasive ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was coupled with SEM observations. The proposed protocol was tested on microsamples of various cellulosic materials from traditional Japanese samurai armours dating from the 16th to the 20th centuries (Morigi Collection, Museo delle Culture, Lugano, Switzerland). The results facilitated a complete characterisation of the materials and demonstrated that the protocol can be used to study a wide variety of cellulosic materials, including both natural and man-modified fibres, and paper.

Differentiating between Natural and Modified Cellulosic Fibres Using ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy

Geminiani L.
;
Campione F. P.;Corti C.;Luraschi M.;Motella S.;Recchia S.;Rampazzi L.
2022-01-01

Abstract

This paper presents the limitations and potential of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy applied to the study of cellulosic textile collections The technique helps to differentiate natural fibres according to the content of lignin, pectin, hemicellulose, and wax, although some problematic issues should be considered. The spectral differences derived from the environmental humidity uptake and the plant composition are reviewed and discussed in the light of new experimental data. Diagnostic bands are proposed that can discriminate between different fibres from different plants. The contribution of ageing is also considered, demonstrating that sometimes aged fibres cannot be reliably recognised. In contrast, the potential of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to discriminate between natural and modified fibres is discussed and proven. The best results were obtained when microinvasive ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was coupled with SEM observations. The proposed protocol was tested on microsamples of various cellulosic materials from traditional Japanese samurai armours dating from the 16th to the 20th centuries (Morigi Collection, Museo delle Culture, Lugano, Switzerland). The results facilitated a complete characterisation of the materials and demonstrated that the protocol can be used to study a wide variety of cellulosic materials, including both natural and man-modified fibres, and paper.
2022
2022
cellulose; ATR-FTIR; SEM; viscose; natural fibres; paper; ageing
Geminiani, L.; Campione, F. P.; Corti, C.; Luraschi, M.; Motella, S.; Recchia, S.; Rampazzi, L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2147051
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