Little is known on the effects of respiratory patterns on baroreflex function in heart failure (HF). Patients with HF (n = 30, age 61.6 ± 10 years, mean ± SD) and healthy controls (CNT, n = 10, age 58.9 ± 5.6 years) having their R-R interval (RRI, EKG), systolic arterial blood pressure (SBP, Finapres) and respiratory signal (RSP, Respitrace) monitored, were subjected to three recording sessions: free-breathing, fast- (≥ 12 bpm) and slow- (6 bpm) paced breathing. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and power spectra of RRI, SBP, and RSP signals were calculated. During free-breathing, compared to CNT, HF patients showed a significantly greater modulation of respiratory volumes in the very-low-frequency (< 0.04 Hz) range and their BRS was not significantly different from that of CNT. During fast-paced breathing, when very-low-frequency modulations of respiration were reduced, BRS of HF patients was significantly lower than that of CNT and lower than during free breathing. During slow-paced breathing, BRS became again significantly higher than during fast breathing. In conclusion: (1) in free-breathing HF patients is present a greater modulation of respiratory volumes in the very-low-frequency range; (2) in HF patients modulation of respiration in the very-low and low frequency (around 0.1 Hz) ranges contributes to preserve baroreflex-mediated control of heart rate.

Respiratory patterns and baroreflex function in heart failure

Castiglioni, Paolo
2023-01-01

Abstract

Little is known on the effects of respiratory patterns on baroreflex function in heart failure (HF). Patients with HF (n = 30, age 61.6 ± 10 years, mean ± SD) and healthy controls (CNT, n = 10, age 58.9 ± 5.6 years) having their R-R interval (RRI, EKG), systolic arterial blood pressure (SBP, Finapres) and respiratory signal (RSP, Respitrace) monitored, were subjected to three recording sessions: free-breathing, fast- (≥ 12 bpm) and slow- (6 bpm) paced breathing. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and power spectra of RRI, SBP, and RSP signals were calculated. During free-breathing, compared to CNT, HF patients showed a significantly greater modulation of respiratory volumes in the very-low-frequency (< 0.04 Hz) range and their BRS was not significantly different from that of CNT. During fast-paced breathing, when very-low-frequency modulations of respiration were reduced, BRS of HF patients was significantly lower than that of CNT and lower than during free breathing. During slow-paced breathing, BRS became again significantly higher than during fast breathing. In conclusion: (1) in free-breathing HF patients is present a greater modulation of respiratory volumes in the very-low-frequency range; (2) in HF patients modulation of respiration in the very-low and low frequency (around 0.1 Hz) ranges contributes to preserve baroreflex-mediated control of heart rate.
2023
2023
Radaelli, Alberto; Mancia, Giuseppe; Balestri, Giulia; Bonfanti, Daniela; Castiglioni, Paolo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2149195
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