Unlabelled: Although SGLT2 inhibitors have been initially employed in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, their clinical use was later extended to the treatment of other conditions such as heart failure, chronic kidney disease and obesity. In patients with type 2 diabetes, the administration of SGLT2 inhibitors has been associated with an increased incidence of urogenital infections, which may be linked to high glucose levels in the urine. The rate of urogenital side effects may be different in non-diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to review the risk of urogenital infections in non-diabetic patients taking SGLT2 inhibitors. Materials and methods: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis by searching PubMed and EMBASE for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting urogenital adverse effects in non-diabetic patients treated with SGLT2 inhibitors. Odds ratios for urogenital infections were calculated using random effect Mantel-Haenszel statistics. Results: Out of 387 citations retrieved, 12 eligible RCTs were assessed for risk of bias and included in the meta-analysis. Compared to placebo, SGLT2 inhibitors were associated with increased odds of genital infections (OR 3.01, 95% CI: 1.93- 4.68, 9 series, 7326 participants, Z = 5.74, p < 0.0001, I2 = 0%) as well as urinary tract infections (OR 1.33, 95% CI: 1.13-1.57, 9 series, 7326 participants, Z = 4.05, p < 0.0001, I2 = 0%). When four trials investigating the effects of SGLT2 inhibitors in populations including both diabetic and non-diabetic patients were considered, administration of SGLT2 inhibitors in diabetic patients was associated with significantly higher odds of genital infections but not urinary tract infections compared to patients without type 2 diabetes. In patients taking placebo, the odds for urinary tract infections were significantly increased in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic patients. Conclusions: The risk of genital infections is increased also in non-diabetic patients taking SGLT2 inhibitors although at a lesser extent that in diabetics. A careful assessment of the local anatomical conditions and of the history of previous urogenital infections is desirable to select those patients who need more intense follow-up, possibly combined with prophylactic measures of infections during treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors.

Risk of urogenital infections in non-diabetic patients treated with sodium glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Systematic review and meta-analysis

Perletti, Gianpaolo;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Unlabelled: Although SGLT2 inhibitors have been initially employed in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, their clinical use was later extended to the treatment of other conditions such as heart failure, chronic kidney disease and obesity. In patients with type 2 diabetes, the administration of SGLT2 inhibitors has been associated with an increased incidence of urogenital infections, which may be linked to high glucose levels in the urine. The rate of urogenital side effects may be different in non-diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to review the risk of urogenital infections in non-diabetic patients taking SGLT2 inhibitors. Materials and methods: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis by searching PubMed and EMBASE for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting urogenital adverse effects in non-diabetic patients treated with SGLT2 inhibitors. Odds ratios for urogenital infections were calculated using random effect Mantel-Haenszel statistics. Results: Out of 387 citations retrieved, 12 eligible RCTs were assessed for risk of bias and included in the meta-analysis. Compared to placebo, SGLT2 inhibitors were associated with increased odds of genital infections (OR 3.01, 95% CI: 1.93- 4.68, 9 series, 7326 participants, Z = 5.74, p < 0.0001, I2 = 0%) as well as urinary tract infections (OR 1.33, 95% CI: 1.13-1.57, 9 series, 7326 participants, Z = 4.05, p < 0.0001, I2 = 0%). When four trials investigating the effects of SGLT2 inhibitors in populations including both diabetic and non-diabetic patients were considered, administration of SGLT2 inhibitors in diabetic patients was associated with significantly higher odds of genital infections but not urinary tract infections compared to patients without type 2 diabetes. In patients taking placebo, the odds for urinary tract infections were significantly increased in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic patients. Conclusions: The risk of genital infections is increased also in non-diabetic patients taking SGLT2 inhibitors although at a lesser extent that in diabetics. A careful assessment of the local anatomical conditions and of the history of previous urogenital infections is desirable to select those patients who need more intense follow-up, possibly combined with prophylactic measures of infections during treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors.
2023
2023
https://www.pagepressjournals.org/index.php/aiua/article/view/11509
Sodium glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors; Urinary tract infections; Genital infections; Candidiasis; Heart failure; Chronic kidney disease; Obesity
Bapir, Rawa; Bhatti, Kamran Hassan; Eliwa, Ahmed; García-Perdomo, Herney Andrés; Gherabi, Nazim; Hennessey, Derek; Magri, Vittorio; Mourmouris, Panagiotis; Ouattara, Adama; Perletti, Gianpaolo; Philipraj, Joseph; Stamatiou, Konstantinos; Tolani, Musliu Adetola; Tzelves, Lazaros; Anker, Stefan D; Trinchieri, Alberto; Buchholz, Noor
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2155731
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