Objective: Accumulating evidence suggested the detrimental effects of adopting minimally invasive surgery in the management of early-stage cervical cancer. However, long-term evidence on the role of minimally invasive radical hysterectomy in “low-risk” patients exists. Methods: This is multi-institutional retrospective study comparing minimally invasive and open radical hysterectomy in low-risk early-stage cervical cancer patients. A propensity-score matching algorithm (1:2) was used to allocate patients into the study groups. Kaplan-Meir model was used to estimate 10-year progression-free and overall survival. Results: Charts of 224 “low-risk” patients were retrieved. Overall, 50 patients undergoing radical hysterectomy were matched with 100 patients undergoing open radical hysterectomy. Minimally invasive radical hysterectomy was associated with a longer median operative time (224 (range, 100–310) vs. 184 (range, 150–240) minutes; p < 0.001), lower estimated blood loss (10 (10-100) vs. 200 (100−1000) ml, p < 0.001), and shorter length of hospital stay (3.8 (3-6) vs. 5.1 (4-12); p < 0.001). Surgical approach did not influence the risk of having intra-operative (4% vs. 1%; p = 0.257) and 90-day severe (grade 3+) postoperative complication rates (4% vs. 8%; p = 0.497). Ten-year disease-free survival was similar between groups (94% vs. 95%; p = 0.812; HR:1.195; 95%CI:0.275, 5.18). Ten-year overall survival was similar between groups (98% vs. 96%; p = 0.995; HR:0.994; 95%CI:0.182, 5.424). Conclusions: Our study appears to support emerging evidence suggesting that, for low-risk patients, laparoscopic radical hysterectomy does not result in worse 10-year outcomes compared to the open approach. However, further research is needed and open abdominal radical hysterectomy remains the standard treatment for cervical cancer patients.

Ten-year outcomes following laparoscopic and open abdominal radical hysterectomy for “low-risk” early-stage cervical cancer: A propensity-score based analysis

Casarin J.;Ghezzi F.;Ervas E.;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Objective: Accumulating evidence suggested the detrimental effects of adopting minimally invasive surgery in the management of early-stage cervical cancer. However, long-term evidence on the role of minimally invasive radical hysterectomy in “low-risk” patients exists. Methods: This is multi-institutional retrospective study comparing minimally invasive and open radical hysterectomy in low-risk early-stage cervical cancer patients. A propensity-score matching algorithm (1:2) was used to allocate patients into the study groups. Kaplan-Meir model was used to estimate 10-year progression-free and overall survival. Results: Charts of 224 “low-risk” patients were retrieved. Overall, 50 patients undergoing radical hysterectomy were matched with 100 patients undergoing open radical hysterectomy. Minimally invasive radical hysterectomy was associated with a longer median operative time (224 (range, 100–310) vs. 184 (range, 150–240) minutes; p < 0.001), lower estimated blood loss (10 (10-100) vs. 200 (100−1000) ml, p < 0.001), and shorter length of hospital stay (3.8 (3-6) vs. 5.1 (4-12); p < 0.001). Surgical approach did not influence the risk of having intra-operative (4% vs. 1%; p = 0.257) and 90-day severe (grade 3+) postoperative complication rates (4% vs. 8%; p = 0.497). Ten-year disease-free survival was similar between groups (94% vs. 95%; p = 0.812; HR:1.195; 95%CI:0.275, 5.18). Ten-year overall survival was similar between groups (98% vs. 96%; p = 0.995; HR:0.994; 95%CI:0.182, 5.424). Conclusions: Our study appears to support emerging evidence suggesting that, for low-risk patients, laparoscopic radical hysterectomy does not result in worse 10-year outcomes compared to the open approach. However, further research is needed and open abdominal radical hysterectomy remains the standard treatment for cervical cancer patients.
2023
Laparoscopy; Open surgery; Radical hysterectomy; Survival
Di Donato, V.; Bogani, G.; Casarin, J.; Ghezzi, F.; Malzoni, M.; Falcone, F.; Petrillo, M.; Capobianco, G.; Calo, F.; D'Auge, T. G.; Muzii, L.; Benedetti Panici, P.; Ervas, E.; Ditto, A.; Raspagliesi, F.; Sopracordevole, F.; Vizza, E.; Giannini, A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2165215
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