ObjectivesThere is evidence that there are differences in survival outcomes among patients with endometrial cancer of different ethnic groups. We aimed to assess the quantity and quality of race/ethnicity reporting in the literature on endometrial cancer published from January 2020 to December 2020. MethodsIn this systematic review, electronic searches of PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Sciences, Scopus, and Cochrane Library databases were performed for all articles published in 2020. A total of 3330 articles were reviewed, of which 949 (35%) peer-reviewed human-based articles focusing on endometrial cancer were included. Non-research-focused articles, review articles, meta-analyses, case reports, and non-human studies were excluded. We analyzed the proportion of studies reporting race/ethnicity and assessed the quality of reporting with regard to the adherence to the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) recommendations. We evaluated the influence of study characteristics on race/ethnicity reporting and compared articles published in journals which adhere to the ICMJE recommendations against those that did not explicitly state that they did. ResultsOf the 949 (28.5%) included articles, 166 (17.5%) reported race/ethnicity of patients, with low quality of reporting. The reporting rate of race/ethnicity was similar when comparing articles from ICMJE and non-ICMJE journals (62 (20.4%) vs 104 (16.1%); p=0.11), prospective versus retrospective studies (53 (22.7%) vs 113 (15.8%); p=0.02), and national versus international studies (147 (17.5%) vs 19 (17.4%); p=0.99). Studies performed in the WHO region of Americas were significantly more consistent in reporting race compared with other regions (119 (44.7%) vs 23 (6.8%) European, 2 (7.4%) Eastern Mediterranean, 21 (7.1%) Western Pacific, 0 (0%) South-East Asia; p<0.001). Female corresponding authors were significantly more consistent in reporting race than male authors (94 (22.5%) vs 72 (13.6%); p<0.001). ConclusionsHuman-based articles focusing on endometrial cancer have a low frequency and quality of race/ethnicity reporting, even in journals claiming to follow ICMJE recommendations.

Race and ethnicity reporting in endometrial cancer literature

Travaglino, Antonio;
2023-01-01

Abstract

ObjectivesThere is evidence that there are differences in survival outcomes among patients with endometrial cancer of different ethnic groups. We aimed to assess the quantity and quality of race/ethnicity reporting in the literature on endometrial cancer published from January 2020 to December 2020. MethodsIn this systematic review, electronic searches of PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Sciences, Scopus, and Cochrane Library databases were performed for all articles published in 2020. A total of 3330 articles were reviewed, of which 949 (35%) peer-reviewed human-based articles focusing on endometrial cancer were included. Non-research-focused articles, review articles, meta-analyses, case reports, and non-human studies were excluded. We analyzed the proportion of studies reporting race/ethnicity and assessed the quality of reporting with regard to the adherence to the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) recommendations. We evaluated the influence of study characteristics on race/ethnicity reporting and compared articles published in journals which adhere to the ICMJE recommendations against those that did not explicitly state that they did. ResultsOf the 949 (28.5%) included articles, 166 (17.5%) reported race/ethnicity of patients, with low quality of reporting. The reporting rate of race/ethnicity was similar when comparing articles from ICMJE and non-ICMJE journals (62 (20.4%) vs 104 (16.1%); p=0.11), prospective versus retrospective studies (53 (22.7%) vs 113 (15.8%); p=0.02), and national versus international studies (147 (17.5%) vs 19 (17.4%); p=0.99). Studies performed in the WHO region of Americas were significantly more consistent in reporting race compared with other regions (119 (44.7%) vs 23 (6.8%) European, 2 (7.4%) Eastern Mediterranean, 21 (7.1%) Western Pacific, 0 (0%) South-East Asia; p<0.001). Female corresponding authors were significantly more consistent in reporting race than male authors (94 (22.5%) vs 72 (13.6%); p<0.001). ConclusionsHuman-based articles focusing on endometrial cancer have a low frequency and quality of race/ethnicity reporting, even in journals claiming to follow ICMJE recommendations.
2023
Carcinoma; Endometrial Neoplasms; Endometrium
Raimondo, Diego; Raffone, Antonio; Pezzullo, Angelo Maria; Doglioli, Marisol; De Benedetti, Pierandrea; Celerino, Pierluigi; De Meis, Lucia; Maletta, Manuela; Raspollini, Arianna; Travaglino, Antonio; Guida, Maurizio; Casadio, Paolo; Seracchioli, Renato
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2167647
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