We present a high-resolution view of bubbles within the Phantom Galaxy (NGC 628), a nearby (similar to 10 Mpc), star-forming (similar to 2 M (circle dot) yr(-1)), face-on (i similar to 9 degrees) grand-design spiral galaxy. With new data obtained as part of the Physics at High Angular resolution in Nearby GalaxieS (PHANGS)-JWST treasury program, we perform a detailed case study of two regions of interest, one of which contains the largest and most prominent bubble in the galaxy (the Phantom Void, over 1 kpc in diameter), and the other being a smaller region that may be the precursor to such a large bubble (the Precursor Phantom Void). When comparing to matched-resolution H alpha observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we see that the ionized gas is brightest in the shells of both bubbles, and is coincident with the youngest (similar to 1 Myr) and most massive (similar to 10(5) M (circle dot)) stellar associations. We also find an older generation (similar to 20 Myr) of stellar associations is present within the bubble of the Phantom Void. From our kinematic analysis of the H I, H-2 (CO), and H ii gas across the Phantom Void, we infer a high expansion speed of around 15 to 50 km s(-1). The large size and high expansion speed of the Phantom Void suggest that the driving mechanism is sustained stellar feedback due to multiple mechanisms, where early feedback first cleared a bubble (as we observe now in the Precursor Phantom Void), and since then supernovae have been exploding within the cavity and have accelerated the shell. Finally, comparison to simulations shows a striking resemblance to our JWST observations, and suggests that such large-scale, stellar-feedback-driven bubbles should be common within other galaxies.

PHANGS-JWST First Results: Multiwavelength View of Feedback-driven Bubbles (the Phantom Voids) across NGC 628

Sormani M;
2023-01-01

Abstract

We present a high-resolution view of bubbles within the Phantom Galaxy (NGC 628), a nearby (similar to 10 Mpc), star-forming (similar to 2 M (circle dot) yr(-1)), face-on (i similar to 9 degrees) grand-design spiral galaxy. With new data obtained as part of the Physics at High Angular resolution in Nearby GalaxieS (PHANGS)-JWST treasury program, we perform a detailed case study of two regions of interest, one of which contains the largest and most prominent bubble in the galaxy (the Phantom Void, over 1 kpc in diameter), and the other being a smaller region that may be the precursor to such a large bubble (the Precursor Phantom Void). When comparing to matched-resolution H alpha observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we see that the ionized gas is brightest in the shells of both bubbles, and is coincident with the youngest (similar to 1 Myr) and most massive (similar to 10(5) M (circle dot)) stellar associations. We also find an older generation (similar to 20 Myr) of stellar associations is present within the bubble of the Phantom Void. From our kinematic analysis of the H I, H-2 (CO), and H ii gas across the Phantom Void, we infer a high expansion speed of around 15 to 50 km s(-1). The large size and high expansion speed of the Phantom Void suggest that the driving mechanism is sustained stellar feedback due to multiple mechanisms, where early feedback first cleared a bubble (as we observe now in the Precursor Phantom Void), and since then supernovae have been exploding within the cavity and have accelerated the shell. Finally, comparison to simulations shows a striking resemblance to our JWST observations, and suggests that such large-scale, stellar-feedback-driven bubbles should be common within other galaxies.
2023
2023
Barnes, At; Watkins, Ej; Meidt, Se; Kreckel, K; Sormani, M; Tress, Rg; Glover, Sco; Bigiel, F; Chandar, R; Emsellem, E; Lee, Jc; Leroy, Ak; Sandstrom, Km; Schinnerer, E; Rosolowsky, E; Belfiore, F; Blanc, Ga; Boquien, M; Brok, Jd; Cao, Yx; Chevance, M; Dale, Da; Egorov, Ov; Eibensteiner, C; Grasha, K; Groves, B; Hassani, H; Henshaw, Jd; Jeffreson, S; Jiménez-Donaire, Mj; Keller, Bw; Klessen, Rs; Koch, Ew; Kruijssen, Jmd; Larson, Kl; Li, J; Liu, Dz; Lopez, La; Murphy, Ej; Neumann, L; Pety, J; Pinna, F; Querejeta, M; Renaud, F; Saito, T; Sarbadhicary, Sk; Sardone, A; Smith, Rj; Stuber, Sk; Sun, Jy; Thilker, Da; Usero, A; Whitmore, Bc; Williams, Tg
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2171020
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