Ovarian cancer represents one of the most malignant gynecological cancers worldwide, with an overall 5-year survival rate, being locked in the 25–30% range in the last decade. Cancer immunotherapy is currently one of the most intensively investigated and promising therapeutic strat- egy and as such, is expected to provide in the incoming years significant benefits for ovarian cancer treatment as well. Here, we provide a detailed survey on the highly pleiotropic oncosuppressive roles played by the human RNASET2 gene, whose protein product has been consistently reported to estab- lish a functional crosstalk between ovarian cancer cells and key cellular effectors of the innate immune system (the monocyte/macrophages lineage), which is in turn able to promote the recruitment to the cancer tissue of M1-polarized, antitumoral macrophages. This feature, coupled with the ability of T2 ribonucleases to negatively affect several cancer-related parameters in a cell-autonomous manner on a wide range of ovarian cancer experimental models, makes human RNASET2 a very promising candidate to develop a “multitasking” therapeutic approach for innovative future applications for ovarian cancer treatment.

Human RNASET2: A Highly Pleiotropic and Evolutionary Conserved Tumor Suppressor Gene Involved in the Control of Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis

Antonino Bruno;Lorenzo Mortara
;
Douglas M. Noonan;Roberto Valli;Giovanni Porta;Roberto Taramelli;Francesco Acquati
2022

Abstract

Ovarian cancer represents one of the most malignant gynecological cancers worldwide, with an overall 5-year survival rate, being locked in the 25–30% range in the last decade. Cancer immunotherapy is currently one of the most intensively investigated and promising therapeutic strat- egy and as such, is expected to provide in the incoming years significant benefits for ovarian cancer treatment as well. Here, we provide a detailed survey on the highly pleiotropic oncosuppressive roles played by the human RNASET2 gene, whose protein product has been consistently reported to estab- lish a functional crosstalk between ovarian cancer cells and key cellular effectors of the innate immune system (the monocyte/macrophages lineage), which is in turn able to promote the recruitment to the cancer tissue of M1-polarized, antitumoral macrophages. This feature, coupled with the ability of T2 ribonucleases to negatively affect several cancer-related parameters in a cell-autonomous manner on a wide range of ovarian cancer experimental models, makes human RNASET2 a very promising candidate to develop a “multitasking” therapeutic approach for innovative future applications for ovarian cancer treatment.
https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms
RNASET2; ovarian cancer; tumor suppressor genes; tumor microenvironment
Bruno, Antonino; Mortara, Lorenzo; Noonan, Douglas M.; Valli, Roberto; Porta, Giovanni; Taramelli, Roberto; Acquati, Francesco
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11383/2140051
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